Rishiri Kombu seaweed 30gr

Rishiri Kombu is mainly used to make dashi broths and is particularly popular in tea ceremony dishes in Kyoto. In Japan, most of the kombu is harvested in Hokkaido, which accounts for about 90% of total production...

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It is thinner than ma-kombu and roughly triangle-shaped near the stem.
The leaves are dark-brown and hard. It is mainly used to make dashi broths and is particularly popular in tea ceremony dishes in Kyoto.
The hard leaves prevent discolouration or deterioration while shaving, making it an ideal ingredient for high-end tororo-kombu.

Kombu seaweed from Hokkaido been distributed throughout Japan for many years and is an important source of trade. The kombu seaweed harvested in Hokkaido was previously transported by boat, moving westward along the coast of the Sea of Japan to Osaka, which has been a commercial centre ever since that time.
For this reason, wholesalers and kombu seaweed processors are mainly located in or around Osaka.
The route the kombu takes from Hokkaido to its destination is called the Kombu Road. It extends to China via Okinawa.
This seaweed is found in many countries around the world, mainly in Japan, but also Russia, China, the Tasmanian islands, Australia, South Africa, the Scandinavian peninsula and Canada.
In Japan, most of the kombu is harvested in Hokkaido, which accounts for about 90% of total production. The waters of the Arctic Ocean that travel from Siberia to Hokkaido are rich in minerals and provide an environment that produces delicious kombu.

The equipment used in Japan to dry kombu seaweed in the sun meets the most demanding health and safety standards, making Japanese kombu particularly popular worldwide. Rishiri-kombu is soft, saltier and harder than ma-kombu. Its dashi broth is rich, tasty and clear.

  • Weight 30g net
  • Ingredients : 100% rishiri kombu (saccharina japonica)
  • Packaging : transparent jar
  • Storage : store away from light, heat and moisture
  • Origin : Japan
Historically, the town of Sakai had a large number of craftsmen specialising in the production of scraped kombu or Oborokombu. The reason is simple : its port is one of the major places for trade in this seaweed. What is more, the proximity of master craftmen knifemaker ensured the constant supply of quality knives, essential to make Oboro kombu. In 1945, after the Second World War, Izuri moved to Shimanto (Kôchi prefecture) to open a training centre for Oboro master craftsmen. Kombu seaweed is eaten a great deal in Kôchi prefecture ( the makis made from Oborokombu seaweed are a Kôchi specialty ). Oborokombu seaweed production is traditionally a family affair. All the members of the family have their role to play. One problem, the passing down of know-how was restricted. Izuri Kombu Kaisan is unique in Japan. It is the only company to employ Oborokombu seaweed master craftsmen, ensuring stable quality. What is more, it also ensures the replacement of existing master craftsmen by training their successors. It is important to remember that Izuri "oborokombu" scraped kombu is totally hand produced in Japan.

Where does the "Oborokombu" name come from ?

‘Oboro’ describes something "nebulous". This seawed is scraped so thinly that it is almost possible to see through it. Oborokombu seaweed is naturally rich and full of umami. It melts in the mouth and has a delicate taste of the sea.

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Rishiri Kombu seaweed 30gr

Rishiri Kombu seaweed 30gr

Rishiri Kombu is mainly used to make dashi broths and is particularly popular in tea ceremony dishes in Kyoto. In Japan, most of the kombu is harvested in Hokkaido, which accounts for about 90% of total production...

Write your review

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